Watercolor
Watercolor (Italian aquarelle or aqua-tento, French aquarelle, English painting in water colors, German Wasserfarbengemalde, Aquarellmalerei) - means painting with water (i.e., water-soluble) paints. watercolor Watercolor technique has been known for…

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Modern landscape
Landscape is a young genre of fine art. The image of nature has emerged relatively recently in an independent niche. Until the XVII-XVIII centuries, the concept of "landscape" did not…

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Pop Art
Pop art (popular art from popular art) is a trend that first emerged in modernist fine art, and then in various areas of mass culture of the 20th century. Pop…

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distinction between

Cubist sculpture

Just like in painting, cubist sculpture is rooted in the reduction by Paul Cezanne of drawn objects to compound planes and geometric bodies (cubes, spheres, cylinders and cones). And just like in painting, it became an all-pervasive influence and significantly contributed to constructivism and futurism.

Cubist sculpture developed in parallel with cubism in painting. In the fall of 1909, Picasso created “The Head of a Woman (Fernando)” with positive features using negative and positive space. According to Douglas Cooper: “The first real cubist sculpture was the impressive“ Woman’s Head ”by Picasso, modeled in 1909-1910, the equivalent in three dimensions for many of these analytical and faceted heads in his paintings of that time.” These positive / negative changes were ambitiously used by Alexander Arkhipenko in 1912-1913, for example, in The Walking Woman. After Arkhipenko, Jozsef Chaki was the first sculptor in Paris to join the Cubists, with whom he exhibited Continue reading

Cubism until 1914

There is a clear distinction between the cubists of Canweiler and the cubists of the Salon. Until 1914, Braque, Picasso and Leger (to a lesser extent), Gris received the support of the only interested art dealer in Paris, Daniel-Henri Canweiler, who guaranteed them an annual income for the exclusive right to acquire their work. I sold them only to a small circle of connoisseurs. His support gave artists the freedom to experiment in relative privacy. Picasso worked at Montmartre until 1912, while Braque and Gris remained there until the end of World War I. Leger settled on Montparnasse.
Recommended illustration:
Albert Gleize Man on a Balcony (Portrait of Dr. Théo Morinaud) (1912, oil on canvas, 195.6 x 114.9 cm, Philadelphia Museum of Art). Finished in the same year as the book of Albert Glease “On Cubism” in collaboration with Jean Metzenge. Exhibited at the Autumn Salon in Paris in 1912, and at the Arsenal Exhibition in New York, Chicago and Boston in 1913.

At the same time, salon cubists built their reputation, first of all, regularly exhibiting at the Autumn Salon and the Salon Continue reading

Buonarroti Michelangelo
He received his primary education at a Latin school in Florence. He studied painting at Ghirlandaio, sculpture at Bertoldo di Giovanni in the art school founded by Lorenzo Medici in…

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Roerich Nikolai Konstantinovich
Member of the World of Art. Since the 1920s he lived in India. Emotional, colorful and decorative compositions inspired by the history of Ancient Russia (“The Messenger”, 1897), Indian and…

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Portuguese painting
Portuguese painting is practically unknown in our country, unfortunately, it did not receive such a high-profile fame as, say, the painting of famous Italian or French masters. Although, in the…

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17th century Italian painting
At the turn of the 16th and 17th centuries, two artistic trends emerged in Italian painting: one related to the art of Caravaggio, the second to the work of the…

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